2022 I Canada

Gross Salary Calculator

Start with your employee’s net pay and easily work your way back to gross pay.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!

Gross Salary is: $0.00

Please note: The calculations are approximate and should be used for illustrative purposes only. The calculator does not include non-refundable tax credits other than the basic personal tax credit.

Net Salary

$0.00

Federal Tax deductions

+$0.00

Provincial Tax deductions

+$0.00

CPP deductions

+$0.00

EI deductions

+$0.00

Total Taxes

+$0.00

Gross Pay

$0.00

Marginal Tax Rate

0.00%

Average Tax Rate

0.00%

Get this calculator for your website

Embed our Gross Salary Calculator on your website or application for free.

Frequently Asked Questions

As experts in Canadian payroll legislation, we’re often asked about minimum wage, overtime, and more. Here’s a list of our most frequently asked questions.  

What is minimum wage?

Minimum wage is the lowest wage rate an employer can pay an employee. Most employees are eligible for minimum wage, whether they are full-time, part-time, casual employees, or are paid an hourly rate, commission, piece rate, flat rate, or salary.  

Minimum wage differs from one province or territory to the next. The following table provides the general minimum wage at the federal and provincial/territorial level as well dates these rates became effective.

For more information minimal wage compliance and rules, please refer to your provincial provincial/territorial website linked below.

Additional Resources
  • See The National Payroll Institute’s Minimum Wage Updates for information on special minimum wage rates for certain categories of employees.
  • For a handy guide, download this Minimum Wage Map. Please note, some local exceptions based on profession.

Minimum Wage by Province

See our 2021 Canadian Payroll Year-End Guide for a table outlining the minimum hourly rate for general workers by province or territory.

The following table provides an overview of the minimum hourly rate for general workers by province or territory:

Jurisdiction
Hourly Rate (General Workers)
Effective Date

Federal

$15.00
December 29, 2021
$15.00
October 1, 2018
$15.20
June 1, 2021
$11.95
October 1, 2021
$11.75
April 1, 2021
$12.75
October 1, 2021
$15.20
September 1, 2021
$12.95
April 1, 2021
$16.00
April 1, 2020
$15.00
January 1, 2022
$13.00
April 1, 2021
$13.50
May 1, 2021
$11.81
October 1, 2021

What is overtime?

Canadian labour laws protect workers from being overworked and underpaid. Labour laws also include overtime. If your employees work over a certain threshold, you are required to pay them extra. In most provinces, the overtime rate is 1.5 times the employee’s regular compensation, and it’s typically paid after an employee works more than eight hours a day or 40 hours per week. That said, there are several exceptions, and the overtime rate may differ depending on location.

Who is entitled to overtime?

Hourly and salaried workers are eligible to receive overtime pay in Canada. However, there are some exempt professions that don’t qualify for overtime pay – including doctors, lawyers, and architects, among others. It’s also important to note that managers and supervisors are exempt from overtime pay. Who is and isn’t entitled to overtime varies by province, so please refer to provincial guidelines for more information.

Provincial Overtime Rates

The following table outlines federal and provincial overtime calculations:

Jurisdiction
Overtime Rate
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 44 hours a week
Daily: Time and a half after eight hours, double time after 12 hours Weekly: Time and a half after 40 hours
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week
No less than minimum wage + 1/2 after 44 hours a week (minimum overtime wage rate is $17.63)
Minimum overtime wage $18.23 in excess of 40 hours per week
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week
Time and a half after 48 hours a week
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week
Time and a half after 44 hours a week
Time and a half after 48 hours a week
Time and a half after 40 hours a week
Time and a half after eight or ten hours a day or 40 hours a week
Time and a half after eight hours a day or 40 hours a week

What is reporting pay?

Reporting pay, sometimes referred to as call-in pay, is the minimum amount an employer is required to pay an employee for reporting to work for a shift. Examples of this include when employees are scheduled to work a shift and the shift is cancelled or shortened, or when employees are called into work when not previously scheduled.

Reporting pay is meant to ensure that all employees called into work, where there are no regularly scheduled hours or outside of their regularly scheduled hours, are compensated for any expenses or costs incurred by having to report to work.  

Additional Resources

For more information on reporting pay, including frequently asked questions and sample scenarios, see the legislation here.

Reporting Pay by Province

The following table outlines the reporting pay by province:

Jurisdiction
Reporting Pay

Federal

Three hours at minimum wage
Three hours at minimum wage or regular wage for actual hours worked
Two hours at regular wage
Four hours scheduled for a shift eight hours or more
Three hours at regular wage
Three hours at minimum wage or minimum overtime rate for hours worked or hours worked at regular wage
Four hours at regular wage
Three hours at minimum wage
Four hours at regular wage
Three hours at regular wage
Three hours at regular wage
Three hours at regular wage
Three hours at regular wage
Two hours at regular wage or applicable overtime wage



Disclaimer: The information provided in this guide is for informational purposes only. It is not professional financial or legal advice nor is it intended to be a substitute therefore. Where there are discrepancies between the guide and information provided by the federal government, provincial government, or the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) or Revenu Québec, defer to the guidelines provided by the governing agencies.

Explore the Benefits of In-House Payroll

If you’re thinking about taking your Canadian payroll in-house, this is the guide for you. See how making the move gives you greater control, saves you money, and gives you more time back in your day.