2022 I Canada

Income Tax Calculator

Try our easy Canada income tax calculator to quickly estimate your 2022 federal and provincial income taxes. See your tax bracket, marginal tax rate, average tax rate, tax deductions, tax refunds, or taxes owed in 2022.

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Please note: The calculations are approximate and should be used for illustrative purposes only. The calculator does not include non-refundable tax credits other than the basic personal tax credit.
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Total income

$0.00

Federal Tax deductions

-$0.00

Provincial Tax deductions

-$0.00

CPP deductions

-$0.00

EI deductions

-$0.00

Total Taxes

-$0.00

Net Pay

$0.00

Tax Savings

$0.00

Marginal Tax Rate

0.00%

Average Tax Rate

0.00%

Your take home salary is: $0.00

If you make $100,000.00 a year Alberta, you will be taxed $27,582.22. That means that your net pay will be $72,417.78 per year, or $1200 per month. Your average tax rate is 27.58% and your marginal tax rate is 36.00%. This marginal tax rate means that your immediate additional income will be taxed at this rate. For instance, an increase of $100 in your salary will be taxed $10, hence, your net pay will only increase by $90.

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Net salary

Average Tax Rate

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Frequently Asked Questions

As experts in Canadian payroll legislation, we’re often asked about income tax. Here’s a list of our most frequently asked questions.  

What is TD1?

TD1, Personal Tax Credits Return, is a form used to determine the amount of tax to be deducted from an individual's employment income or other income, such as pension income.  

There are federal and provincial/territorial TD1 forms. Individuals complete these forms and provide them to their employer who keeps the completed documents with their records.  

Who should complete the TD1 form?

Individuals who meet one of the following criteria should complete the form and provide it to their employer:

  • have a new employer or payer
  • want to change amounts from previous claimed
  • want to claim the deduction for living in a prescribed zone
  • want to increase the amount of tax deducted at source

Individuals do not have to complete a new TD1 every year unless there is a change to their federal, provincial, or territorial personal tax credit amounts.

What are the federal TD1 changes for 2022?

See our 2021 Canadian Payroll Year-End Guide for a table outlining the federal TD1 changes for 2022.

What are the provincial TD1 changes for 2022?

See our 2021 Canadian Payroll Year-End Guide for a table outlining the provincial TD1 changes for 2022.

Additional Resources

Disclaimer: The information provided in this guide is for informational purposes only. It is not professional financial or legal advice nor is it intended to be a substitute therefore. Where there are discrepancies between the guide and information provided by the federal government, provincial government, or the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) or Revenu Québec, defer to the guidelines provided by the governing agencies.

Federal TD1 Changes for 2022

The following table provides a list of federal TD1 changes for 2022:

Federal TD1 (form)
2022
2021
Basic personal*
$14,398*
$13,808
Child amount
$2,350
$2,295
Age amount
$7,898
$7,713
Pension income amount
$2,000
$2,000
Disability amount
$8,870
$8,662
Spouse or common-law partner amount
$14,398*
$13,808
Amount for eligible dependent
$14,398*
$13,808

Caregiver amount or infirm amount for dependent 18+

$7,525
$7,348

*If the employee's taxable income from all sources for the year will be $151,978 or less. Employees with an income greater than $151,978 can complete TD1-WS Worksheet to calculate their partial claim.

Provincial TD1 Changes for 2022

The following table provides a list of provincial TD1 changes for 2022 as well as links to the provincial TD1 form:

Basic Personal Amount
2022
2021

Alberta (form)

$19,369
$19,369

British Columbia (form)

$11,302
$11,070

Manitoba (form)

$10,145
$9,936

New Brunswick (form)

$10,817
$10,564

Newfoundland and Labrador (form)

$9,803
$9,536

Northwest Territories (form)

$15,609
$15,243

Nova Scotia (form)

$11,481*
$11,481

Nunavut (form)

$16,862
$16,467

Ontario (form)

$11,141
$10,880

Prince Edward Island (form)

$11,250
$10,500

Québec (EN) (FR)

$16,143
$15,728

Saskatchewan (form)

$16,615
$16,225

Yukon (form)

$14,398**
$13,808


*If the employee's taxable income from all sources for the year will be $25,000 or less. Employees in Nova Scotia with an income greater than $25,000 can complete TD1NS-WS Worksheet to calculate their partial claim.
**If the employee's taxable income from all sources for the year will be $151,978 or less. Employees in Yukon with an income greater than $151,978 can complete TD1YT-WS Worksheet to calculate their partial claim.

Explore the Benefits of In-House Payroll

If you’re thinking about taking your Canadian payroll in-house, this is the guide for you. See how making the move gives you greater control, saves you money, and gives you more time back in your day.